RESIGNATION TIPS

HOW TO RESIGN:

WHEN?

You should not resign until you have received and accepted a written offer and all the pre-employment requirements have been fulfilled. Pre-employment requirements could include reference checking, employment and education verification, work authorization verification, credit checks, drug test, criminal history checks, etc.

HOW DOES THE PROCESS WORK?

Keep it short and positive. The last thing you want to do is burn any bridges, even if you feel like you have been treated unfairly. Keep in mind the new opportunity you are moving to, not the negative reasons you are leaving.

HOW SHOULD I RESIGN?

Step 1: Before Resigning

You’ve made your decision, there’s no looking back. Develop a transition plan – review the status of current projects and determine if you will be able to complete them in your notice period. Your goal is to make this as easy as possible for everyone. Decide if you are going to present this orally as well as in written form.

Step 2: Resign

Schedule a meeting with your supervisor ASAP so you can get it done. Set up enough time to resign and review your transition plan and any other outstanding issues. As a professional courtesy, make sure your boss is the first to know you are leaving.

At the meeting, review your resignation letter. Let your supervisor know you have thought this through and feel that this is best for your long-term career and that your decision is final.

TIPS IN THE PROCESS:

Step 2: Resign

Also let your supervisor know that you enjoyed working there, have contributed to the team’s success, enjoyed their leadership, and are excited by the new position you have accepted. Since your decision is final, ask that they respect your decision and not make it uncomfortable for you in making a counteroffer.

Keep in mind that this is not a exit interview; questions concerning why you are leaving and what they can do to fix this are not appropriate at this time.

TIPS IN THE PROCESS:

Do not delay; resignations are never easy, especially if you have worked somewhere for a long time. Waiting creates more stress for all parties involved.

Don’t become emotionally involved. Remember the reasons you started to look around to begin with and this is a business/career move.

Most importantly know that your existing employer does not own you, nor do they have the right to know where you are going to be employed next. It is your business until you decide to share that information, if at all. If they pressure you, inform them that you are considering a few options but that your decision to leave is final and that you do not want to use any more company time to interview.

Resign at the end of the day, especially if you detect hostility.

Ask for a letter of recommendation or if they would be a future reference for you.

Two weeks is considered standard notice, although some situations will not accept notice, and you will be terminated immediately.

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